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Without it, employees may be twice as likely to leave.

Companies have been grappling with internal transparency for decades. How much visibility should employees be given regarding key developments and decisions impacting them and the business? And how much input should leaders solicit from employees on these issues?

After nearly two years of unprecedented disruption and uncertainty—and the ongoing Great Resignation—transparency at work has never been more critical. It’s essential to bring challenges and opportunities to the forefront and to instill trust in the leadership and direction of an organization. Perhaps most importantly, according to Future Forum’s Pulse survey, it’s also key to retaining talent. In companies where leaders are not perceived to be transparent, twice as many employees are likely or very likely to leave

All told, according to our research, two-thirds of companies are not engaging employees in planning around the future of work.

The question of whether employees will be required to return to the office and how often has brought the issue of transparency in the workplace to a head. Executives across industries acknowledge that employees want flexibility, but they also admit that there’s a disconnect between themselves and employees on how to move forward. All told, according to our research, two-thirds of companies are not engaging employees in planning around the future of work. And when we have conversations with external executives on this topic, we often hear things like, “Our employees aren’t listening to us” or “They are over-surveyed” or “If we give them an opportunity to voice what they want, we will then have to give it to them” or “We shouldn’t communicate until we have the answers.”

Read the complete Fast Company article BY BRIAN ELLIOT AND DEBBIE LOVICH: https://www.fastcompany.com/90711332/the-great-resignation-antidote-that-costs-companies-nothing

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